Anatomy for Plastic Surgery of the Face, Head, and Neck

Koichi Watanabe, Mohammadali M. Shoja, Marios Loukas, R. Shane Tubbs

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Anatomy for Plastic Surgery of the Face, Head, and Neck details the complex regional anatomy of the face, head and neck, providing plastic surgery and otolaryngology residents with a solid anatomical knowledge base. There are many danger zones involved in operating on the head and neck, and the detailed knowledge of anatomy that readers gain from this reference will help them avoid the surgical mishaps that often result in patient disfigurement.

Key Features:

  • Complex regional anatomy of the head and neck detailed with drawings, intraoperative photos and radiologic images
  • Online access to videos in which authors walk readers through the anatomy of the face, head and neck
  • Covers the latest anatomical topics, including arterial supply of the facial skin and sensory nerves of the head and neck

This excellent anatomical reference will be read cover to cover by young plastic surgeons and otolaryngologists, as well as residents in these specialties. More experienced surgeons will refer to it whenever they need to learn about an unfamiliar area of the head and neck.

Hypotheses in Clinical Medicine

Contributing Editor: R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D.

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Hypotheses are fundamental to all sciences, including medicine. They play a critical role in motivating the development of science, since interesting and important hypotheses foster the diversity and debate upon which the scientific process depends. It is necessary to learn and understand how to assess a process, realize and discuss details and consequently launch a hypothesis. This book offers a number of novel, non-mainstream hypotheses – in various states of development – from authors with relevant expertise and experience.

Nerves and Nerve Injuries: Vol 1: History, Embryology, Anatomy, Imaging, and Diagnostics

Contributing Editor: R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D.

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Nerves and Nerve Injuries is the first comprehensive work devoted to the nerves of the body. An indispensable work for anyone studying the nerves or treating patients with nerve injuries, these books will become the ‘go to’ resource in the field. The nerves are treated in a systematic manner, discussing details such as their anatomy (both macro- and microscopic), physiology, examination (physical and imaging), pathology, and clinical and surgical interventions. The authors contributing their expertise are international experts on the subject. The books cover topics from detailed nerve anatomy and embryology to cutting-edge knowledge related to treatment, disease and mathematical modeling of the nerves.

Nerves and Nerve Injuries Volume 1 focuses on the history of nerves, embryology, anatomy, imaging, and diagnostics. This volume provides a greatly detailed overview of the anatomy of the peripheral and cranial nerves as well as comprehensive details of imaging modalities and diagnostic tests.

Nerves and Nerve Injuries: Vol 2: Pain, Treatment, Injury, Disease and Future Directions

Contributing Editor: R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D.

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Nerves and Nerve Injuries is a must-have for clinicians and researchers dealing with the Peripheral Nervous System and neuropathy. An indispensable work for anyone studying the nerves or treating patients with nerve injuries, these books will become the ‘go to’ resource in the field. The nerves are treated in a systematic manner, discussing details such as their anatomy (both macro- and microscopic), physiology, examination (physical and imaging), pathology, and clinical and surgical interventions. The authors contributing their expertise are international experts on the subject. The books cover topics from detailed nerve anatomy and embryology to cutting-edge knowledge related to treatment, disease and mathematical modeling of the nerves.

Nerves and Nerve Injuries Volume 2 focuses on pain, treatment, injury, disease and future directions in the field. This volume also addresses new information regarding neural interfaces, stem cells, medical and surgical treatments, and medical legal issues following nerve injury.

Hamilton's History of Medicine and Surgery (Distinguished Men and Women of Science, Medicine and the Arts)

R. Shane Tubbs, Anand N. Bosmia

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William Hamilton's 'History of Medicine, Surgery and Anatomy', penned during the early 19th century, is an elegantly written discussion of the development of medicine and surgery from the dawn of humanity to the 18th century. The authors have rewritten this chronicle, replacing the British English of the period with modern American English, to suit a contemporary readership and thereby add a valuable resource to the arsenal of medical students, healthcare professionals, and other individuals who wish to study with enthusiasm and intellectual curiosity the history of medicine and surgery.

The Chiari Malformations

Contributing Editor: R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D.

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Once an uncommon clinical finding, the Chiari malformations are now frequently seen with the advent of more sophisticated imaging modalities. With more than one hundred years of experience with these entities, medicine currently has a much better understanding of the embryology and pathophysiology of the disorder. Long-term outcome studies are becoming more prevalent and patients are commonly operated on with generally favorable results. Comprehensive in design,  the The Chiari Malformations focuses on the two most common forms of hindbrain herniation, the Chiari I and II malformations.  Since the original description and classification of hindbrain hernias more than one hundred and twenty years ago, the Chiari malformations have revealed much of their pathophysiology and have become easily diagnosed radiologically.  Indeed with the availability of MRI, more and more patients are being labeled with the diagnosis but without symptoms or appropriate symptoms.  Timely and an invaluable addition to the literature, The Chiari Malformations thoroughly details the progress that has been made with our understanding of these conditions, their radiologic definition, details of operative intervention and prediction of outcome.

A History of Human Anatomy

Contributing Editor: R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D.

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Many advances in medicine and surgery can be directly linked to improvements in understanding the structure and function of the human body. During the sixteenth century, the study of human anatomy became an objective discipline, based on direct observation and scientific principles. Not surprisingly, the study of human anatomy has progressed to its universal acceptance and recognition as a scientific discipline, essential for the practice of modern medicine. This revised and expanded edition presents anatomy from antiquity to the modern times. In this book, the authors present many scholars and teachers; the time periods, places, and impact of their work; controversies in anatomy; and advances in the discipline. These topics run the gamut from early pioneers in the art to the development of techniques that have propelled the study of anatomy to its current state. The authors have attempted to present the big picture regarding the historic anatomists and movements that have shaped our current understanding of what we now call medical anatomy. This beautifully illustrated edition spans nearly four centuries of medical history. It was a period of spectacular achievements during which many great medical personalities lived, made important anatomical discoveries, and produced impressive treatises. With the sheer volume of historical anatomy literature available, the authors followed a somewhat eclectic and selective course in presenting the most significant material in this work. As even now man continues to learn about the structure of his body with new and noninvasive technologies such as MRI, uncovering parts of the human anatomy never seen before, the study of the history of anatomy therefore continues alongside the study of anatomy as a scientific discipline without obvious end.

Netter's Atlas of Human Anatomy

Consulting Editor: R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D.

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The gold standard of excellence for 25 years, Frank H. Netter, MD’s Atlas of Human Anatomy offers unsurpassed depictions of the human body in clear, brilliant detail - all from a clinician’s perspective. With its emphasis on anatomic relationships and clinically relevant views, Dr. Netter’s work provides a coherent, lasting visual vocabulary for understanding anatomy and how it applies to medicine today.

NEW TO THIS EDITION: 

  • Explore additional unique perspectives of difficult-to-visualize anatomy through all-new paintings by Dr. Carlos Machado, including breast lymph drainage; the pterygopalantine fossa; the middle ear; the path of the internal carotid artery; and the posterior knee, plus additional new plates on arteries of the limbs and new radiologic images.
  • Master challenging structures with visual region-by-region coverage -- including Muscle Table appendices at the end of each Section.
  • Student Consult access includes a suite of interactive tools and guides, including selected images formatted as self-testing exercises; dissection videos; multiple choice questions; illustrated axial cross-sections and scroll-throughs; Key Point Anatomy Guides; additional plates from previous editions; and more.

Glossopharyngeal Nerve Stimulation: Potential Application in Patients with Epilepsy

R. Shane Tubbs

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To date, no detailed study has explored the potentialfor stimulation of cranial nerves other than thevagus nerve for medically intractable seizures.Medically intractable epilepsy causes significantmorbidity and mortality. While several medicaltherapies for this disease have been developed, eachcan be associated with significant adverse effects.In the United States approximately 30,000 new casesof medically intractable epilepsy are diagnosed eachyear, and only 15% of these patients can be treatedby neurosurgical procedures. Many patients have hadsuccess with stimulation of the vagus nerve. However,some patients do not respond to vagus nervestimulation. The hypothesis tested in the followingfour studies is that glossopharyngeal nervestimulation can provide adequate seizure control withfewer adverse results. The results of this study mayelucidate both the effectiveness and underlyingmechanisms by which glossopharyngeal nervestimulation leads to blunting of seizure activity.Thus, this study lays the groundwork for developmentof a potentially effective method to treat manypatients who currently lack effective antiseizuretherapy.