External cortical landmarks and measurements for the temporal horn: Anatomic study with application to surgery of the temporal lobe

 

Tubbs, R.S., Sharma, A., Loukas, M., Cohen-Gadol, A., 2015l. External cortical landmarks and measurements for the temporal horn: Anatomic study with application to surgery of the temporal lobe. Surg Neurol Int 6, 17. doi:10.4103/2152-7806.150669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

The location of the temporal horn is important to neurosurgeons during procedures such as amygdalohippocampectomy and intraventricular electrode placement for temporal lobe seizure monitoring. However, sometimes the temporal horn is difficult to localize, especially without neuronavigation. The authors aimed to better localize this structure using superficial anatomic landmarks.

METHODS:

Twenty-two brain halves were dissected from the midline, and the fornix identified and followed toward the left and right temporal horns. Once the temporal horn was isolated from a mesial approach, 6-cm long needles were placed into its anterior and posterior walls of the temporal horn and passed laterally from the axial plane to the cortical surface. Pin exit sites were marked externally and measurements taken between the outer temporal lobe cortex and the underlying temporal horn.

RESULTS:

No statistical differences were noted between left and right sides. The temporal horn was generally directed anteroinferiorly and best marked externally by the inferior temporal sulcus. The mean length of the temporal horn was 4.4 cm. Mean distance from anterior temporal tip to anterior wall of the temporal horn was 3.3 cm. The mean distance from the anterior temporal tip to the posterior wall of the temporal horn was 7 cm. The anterior wall of the temporal horn was a mean of 3 mm superior to the inferior temporal sulcus. The posterior wall was a mean of 1.2 cm superior to the inferior temporal sulcus.

CONCLUSIONS:

These landmarks and measurements may help neurosurgeons better localize this part of the lateral ventricular system.